Keyword:Argentina

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Argentina Election 2015: Polls Point to Scioli


This Post is part of Samuel George’s ongoing series “Argentina at a Crossroads”. In it Sam takes a closer look at the newest polls in the run up to the 2015 general elections in Argentina. More ...

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The Crossroads: Argentina


The Crossroads is a new video series from the GED team that focuses on decisive moments for different economies. In our first episode we take a look at Argentina, a country facing turbulent economic conditions and an ongoing debt crisis just as it prepares for crucial presidential elections in October 2015. More ...

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The Rise of the Holdouts: Disrupting Sovereign Debt Restructuring


In the wake of the 2001 Argentine financial crisis and subsequent default, firms specializing in distressed sovereign debt purchased defaulted Argentine bonds at steep discounts with the explicit intent of subsequently litigating for payment of full face value plus interest. These firms have achieved international notoriety stemming from their recent legal victories against the government of Argentina, but the strategy of investing in distressed bonds and resisting restructuring is by no means original. In fact, holdout funds have been developing, improving and employing different strategies for roughly three decades. More ...

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Argentina at a Crossroads


To address Argentina’s economic malaise—and to fully close the door on the 2001 crisis—the next government would need to address subsidies, return the keys to the Central Bank, and come to an agreement with the disdained holdout firms. These are neither easy nor popular measures for a new and untested government. Argentines may say they want change now, but will they reach for the casserole pans if their energy bills spike? More ...

Image Courtesy: Adam Baker © flickr Image Courtesy: Adam Baker © flickr

Quantitative Easing in the EU: Addressing the Symptom or the Cause?


It may be a new year, but Europe’s economic malaise remains decidedly familiar. Current headlines announcing anemic growth, unemployment, and the looming potential of a Syriza-provoked Grexit could easily be pulled from newspapers published in 2011. The eurocrisis increasingly appears like a virus that must be kept in remission. The latest course of treatment, Europe’s version of quantitative easing, was announced by the European Central Bank More ...

Image Courtesy: Diego Torres Silvestre © flickr Image Courtesy: Diego Torres Silvestre © flickr

The Future of Sovereign Debt – the Answer May Lie in Argentina


What happens when sovereign debt goes bad? In the corporate world, debt contracts are subject to bankruptcy and liquidation laws. But no such mechanism exists following sovereign default. Recent legal rulings in the Argentine debt saga suggest that this system may now be unattainable. More ...